Projects Archive - Foundation for Prader-Willi Research | Neurobiology

Consequences of targeted SNORD116 deletion in human and mouse neurons

Abstract The role of the brain in controlling food intake is increasingly apparent, with studies finding that genes related to obesity often play a role in brain regions crucial for feeding, appetite, and satiety. Prader-Willi syndrome, one of the most common forms of genetic obesity, results increased food intake (hyperphagia) leading to severe false

The SNORD116-NHLH2 pathway: insights into the molecular genetic basis of Prader-Willi Syndrome

Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a genetic condition resulting from paternal inheritance of a deletion within an imprinted region of chromosome 15q. The smallest known deleted region encompasses a small nucleolar non-coding RNA locus called SNORD116 (SNORD116), but very little is known about how deletion of SNORD116 leads to PWS. As shown using false

Dissecting a novel brainstem feeding circuit in Prader-Willi syndrome

There is currently no cure for Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). PWS is a complex and debilitating disorder that significantly impacts the lives of not only affected patients, but their families, as well. Recent work has revealed a genetic basis for PWS, and a number of the genes affected are known to have unique expression patterns throughout the false

Gene Expression Analysis in PWS Subject Derived Dental Pulp Stem Cell Neurons (year 2)

There are two goals to this study: 1) To identify differences between individuals with PWS with autism from those who have PWS without autism using technology that analyzes how genes are expressed and 2) To identify a new role for SNORD115 and SNORD116 which may help explain the PWS condition or how other very small molecules that do not make false

A post-mortem study of von Economo neurons in the frontal cortex of brains of persons with PWS (year 2)

Although PWS is best known for hypothalamic obesity and hyperphagia, the cognitive and behavioral issues are the most challenging for families. Previous neuroanatomical studies in PWS have examined cells in the hypothalamus. To date, no data are available on the cellular structure of the brain in PWS in the frontal lobe where executive function false

Wake promoting effects of oxytocin

Caregivers, physicians and patients with PWS report that daytime sleepiness in PWS significantly disrupts daily life. However, the underlying cause of excessive daytime sleepiness in PWS is unknown. Dr. Scammell’s group is exploring the contribution of reduced neuronal function in the hypothalamus region of the brain, specifically, oxytocin/orexin false

Reactivation of the PWS locus via disruption of the ZNF274 silencing complex (year 2)

Through a normal biological process called genomic imprinting, the chromosome 15 that is inherited from the father has a set of genes that are switched on while the same set of genes on the chromosome 15 inherited from the mother are switched off. In Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), there is no normal copy of the paternal chromosome 15 so patients false

A post-mortem study of von Economo neurons in the frontal cortex of brains of persons with PWS

Although PWS is best known for hypothalamic obesity and hyperphagia, the cognitive and behavioral issues are the most challenging for families. Brain difference is the underpinning of the characteristics that define the Prader-Willi personality: food related behaviors, excessive/repetitive behaviors, stress sensitivity/mood disorder, cognitive false

The role of SNORD116 in the neuroendocrine phenotypes of Prader-Willi syndrome

A hallmark symptom of PWS is extreme, unrelenting hyperphagia associated with obesity. Other medical characteristics of individuals with PWS include low circulating growth hormone, short stature, adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism, and hypogonadism. Additionally, individuals with PWS have decreased levels of circulating fasting insulin compared false

Investigating neural development in an induced pluripotent stem cell model of Prader-Willi Syndrome

Recent technological developments have ushered in a new era for the medical research field based on our ability to generate stem cells (called induced pluripotent stem cells or iPSCs) out of adult patient cells, such as blood or skin fibroblasts. There are two important benefits of this technology relevant for research into Prader Willi Syndrome false

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